UK Remembers 2005 London Bombings

The July 7 memorial was unveiled in Hyde Park in 2009.
The July 7 memorial was unveiled in Hyde Park in 2009.

The July 7 memorial was unveiled in Hyde Park in 2009.

Britain will on Tuesday mark 10 years since the London bombings with a minute silence for the 52 victims, less than a fortnight after an attack in Tunisia highlighted the ongoing Islamist threat. Thirty Britons were among 38 people killed when a gunman went on rampage at a popular Tunisia beach resort on June 26, Britain’s worst terror incident since four suicide bombers attacked the London transport network on July 7, 2005. “Ten years on from the 7/7 London attacks, the threat from terrorism continues to be as real as it is deadly,” Prime Minister David Cameron said. “The murder of 30 innocent Britons whilst holidaying in Tunisia is a brutal reminder of that fact. But we will never be cowed by terrorism,” he said. “We will keep on doing all that we can to keep the British public safe, protecting vulnerable young minds from others’ extremist beliefs and promoting the shared values of tolerance, love and respect that make Britons so great,” Cameron said. The commemorations being with wreath-laying at the national memorial in Hyde Park at 8:50am (00GMT), marking the moment the first three bombs exploded on London Underground trains at Aldgate, Edgware Road and Russell Square stations. An hour later, a fourth suicide bomber blew himself up on a double decker bus in Tavistock Square, killing and injuring some of those who had been evacuated from the underground. A total of 52 people died in all four bombings.

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Chukwunonso Azinge is a Public health parasitologist whose variety of intrests ranges from international news reportage, writing articles on current world issues and of course football. Follow me on Twitter @azingelfc and on Facebook- Nonso 'King Kenny' Azinge.

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