Adultery Legalised In South Korea

Critics say the state should not be involved in people's private lives.
Critics say the state should not be involved in people's private lives.

Critics say the state should not be involved in people’s private lives.

South Korea’s top court has ruled that adultery is no longer a crime, revoking a 1953 law under which cheating spouses could be jailed for up to two years. South Korea was one of only three Asian countries to criminalise infidelity- 5,500 people have been convicted since 2008. Presiding judge Park Han-Chul said public conceptions of individuals’ sexual rights had changed. “Even if adultery should be condemned as immoral, state power should not intervene in individuals private lives,” he said. The constitutional court said on Thursday that anyone convicted since 2008 could have their cases reconsidered. But some in South Korea have defended  the law, saying it’s loss would encourage sexual depravity. Justice Ahn Chang-Ho, who read the dissenting opinion at the constitutional court, said that the statute was a key protector of family morals and warned that it’s abolition would “spark a surge in debauchery.”

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Chukwunonso Azinge is a Public health parasitologist whose variety of intrests ranges from international news reportage, writing articles on current world issues and of course football. Follow me on Twitter @azingelfc and on Facebook- Nonso 'King Kenny' Azinge.

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